Pheromone Oils For Attraction

Human pheromones, do you know what they are or how they work? Did you know they may have a significant impact on attraction and in turn your sex life? Right about now you may be thinking that you have never seen a pheromone! You would be correct in your assumption you have never actually seen a pheromone, but you have very likely smelled these pheromone oils. These chemicals are present in animals, plants and humans and stimulate different responses.

Pheromones are chemicals released by one entity to affect the actions of others in the same species. While most of what you hear about humans as explained at http://pheromones-4u.com/pheromones-humans/ you will understand they are linked to sexual activity this is but one of many functions of the chemical. In the animal and plant kingdom, there are many different uses for pheromones including:

  • Alarm
  • Aggregation (kind of an call all affect)
  • Epideictic- warning: certain female insects will leave this pheromone behind warning others to lay their eggs elsewhere.
  • Trail- commonly seen in ants these insects lay down a trail of chemicals for the rest to follow
  • Occupied- animals commonly mark their territory sometimes to attract a mate but many times to alert visitors that the area is already occupied.
  • Mating- the pheromone designation that most people are familiar with, insects, animals and humans emit a pheromone to attract a suitable mate.

These are but a few of the identified pheromone purposes. Scientists believe that each species is equipped with special olfactory senses to detect these chemicals. Yet this is where the discussion commonly fractures. Some say that humans have no such special sense for pheromones yet studies show distinct effect on behavior when they are introduced.

The McClintock Effect is the best-known study on human pheromone interaction. In the study, women were exposed to a whiff of sweat from other women. In each case, the scent from other women had a decided effect on menstrual cycles, depending on when the sweat was collected. Women are already aware of this effect whether they realize what it is called or not, they know that when a group of women congregate regularly their menstrual cycles will synchronize.  Learn more about human pheromones at http://pheromones-planet.com.

Commercialization

Perfume manufactures have spent decades synthesizing human pheromones to add to their products. Perfumes, colognes and body sprays often claim to contain human sex hormones, or at least their synthetic versions. The power of smell is definitely undeniable as is already evidenced by the multi-billion dollar cologne industry and when you add a fewpheromones to the mix as well; the results could be quite impressive.

Conclusion

So, what is a pheromone? It is a unique chemical signature that many living things on the planet can utilize to affect the actions of those of the same species. Whether it is used for protection as in the alarm or aggregate, signal or simply for mating it is a very useful tool by all accounts. Research is consistently showing that wearing pheromones is an effective way of attracting attention! The only question that remains is whether it is wanted attention. I tried a few of these products and they dont work. real pheromones cost a lot of money and if your paying less than $300 for a few ounces, your not getting the real thing. save your money and buy the newest, hottest cologne on the market. 2 sprays on your chest, 1 spray on your neck, and 1 spray on your shirt. thats it. it will do wonders. any cologne will but the newer , hotter cologne shows that you are up to date and hip.

Pheromones are hormones, small peptides. Tehre are several causes of action here, although you are definitely right about the bacteria. The Corynebacteria family on the skin for example produces lipases to break down the lipids on your skin and in your sweat. This leads to the formations of of Propionic acid (Named after Propionibacteria), butyric acid (Yuck) and Stapphylococcus Epidermis create Isovaleric acids. These three, made largely from bacteria metabolism and fats, are what smells so bad. Bacteria don’t really touch pheromones.

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